Classes at Los Angeles English

When you come to Los Angeles English for the first time, you will be greeted by volunteers at the front desk and asked to fill out a registration form. Our volunteers will help you determine the class that will be most suitable for your level and needs. At their own expense, many of our missionaries have left studies at accredited universities to come serve in Los Angeles. They teach these English classes as a service, so student tuition is waived.

Our Locations

Los Angeles English has locations throughout the area. Each location specializes in teaching students with specific native languages like Chinese, Korean, Spanish, or Farsi. Check out our locations to find the most convenient class for you.


Recent posts

New Korean Teacher, Dennis Christen

on June 8, 2017

Proper pronunciation can be the key to having English that sounds like a native. Even those who have a deep understanding of grammar rules and a wide vocabulary can be perceived as beginners when they have a strong accent. The inverse is also true, those who have a very natural sounding accent can sound like native English speakers even without a wide understanding of English language principles!

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Class Tip: Nouns, Adjectives, and Verbs

on May 25, 2017

Noun + Adjective: In a large number of languages across the world, the order of nouns and adjectives goes as follows: “Tree big green”. However, in English most sentences start with the adjectives, followed by the noun at the end. For example, “The big green tree”. This makes it hard for non-native English speakers to accurately describe what they want to say. Rather than starting with the noun and following it with the appropriate describers, we must learn to start with the adjectives finishing with the noun.

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New Class for Russian Speaking Students

on May 25, 2017

To kick start the class, here are a few tips for Russian speakers who want to learn English… Let’s start at the beginning with pronunciation. It can be very discouraging to try to speak with people around only, but no one understands what you are trying to say. Some may say that pronunciation is not important when trying to study a language, but that is not the case with English.

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Transition from Chinese to English

on May 3, 2017

LAE offers different learning levels for Chinese speaking students making the transition to English. It’s no secret that learning English isn’t easy. Aside from the obvious fact that English uses an alphabet and Chinese uses symbols, English words are full of contradictions and there are lots of exceptions to the rules. For instance, there’s a rule called I before E except after C which is helpful in spelling words like “believe.

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