Lessons

Class Tip: Nouns, Adjectives, and Verbs

Noun + Adjective: In a large number of languages across the world, the order of nouns and adjectives goes as follows: “Tree big green”. However, in English most sentences start with the adjectives, followed by the noun at the end. For example, “The big green tree”. This makes it hard for non-native English speakers to accurately describe what they want to say. Rather than starting with the noun and following it with the appropriate describers, we must learn to start with the adjectives finishing with the noun.

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Transition from Chinese to English

LAE offers different learning levels for Chinese speaking students making the transition to English. It’s no secret that learning English isn’t easy. Aside from the obvious fact that English uses an alphabet and Chinese uses symbols, English words are full of contradictions and there are lots of exceptions to the rules. For instance, there’s a rule called I before E except after C which is helpful in spelling words like “believe.” But what about words like “science” or “weird”? Learning English isn’t just about learning the rules, but also the exceptions to the rules.

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English Tips for Farsi Speakers

Below are a few tips for Farsi speaking students who want to learn English: In English, when the letter H is combined with a T, a C, a P, or an S, it changes the entire sound of the consonant. The letter T by itself makes a hard stop, like in the word “cat”, but when combined with an H, it makes a smooth stop, like in the word “math”. The TH sound is made by placing your tongue in between your teeth and blowing, while the T sound is made with the tongue on the roof of the mouth.

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The Order of Adjectives

No native English speaker will say “the green great dragon”… Many native English speakers don’t explicitly know that there is a guideline for the order of adjectives. Instead, they learned the order through experience and conversations. As Mark Forsyth explains, the order must be: opinion–size–age–shape–color–origin–material–purpose

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The Power of the Comma

Here’s some Labor Day fun! Did you know that a simple comma can change the entire meaning of a sentence? Let us show you: A woman, without her man, is nothing. A woman: without her, man is nothing.

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